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Sunday, 13 June 2010 12:23

Principles: Manifesto 2000 for a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence

Written by  Robert Stewart

It is expected that participants of the Canadian Culture of Peace Program would join the over 70,000,000 other signatories world-wide and pledge to follow the six key points of Manifesto 2000 for a Culture of Peace and Non-violence (http://www3.unesco.org/manifesto2000/uk/uk_6points.htm).

This includes, of course, all Peace Cafés.

Because the year 2000 must be a new beginning, an opportunity to transform - all together - the culture of war and violence into a culture of peace and non-violence.

Because this transformation demands the participation of each and every one of us, and must offer young people and future generations the values that can inspire them to shape a world based on justice, solidarity, liberty, dignity, harmony and prosperity for all.

Because the culture of peace can underpin sustainable development, environmental protection and the well-being of each person.

Because I am aware of my share of responsibility for the future of humanity, in particular to the children of today and tomorrow.

I pledge in my daily life, in my family, my work, my community, my country and my region, to:

  • Respect the life and dignity of each human being without discrimination or prejudice;
  • Practise active non-violence, rejecting violence in all its forms: physical, sexual, psychological, economical and social, in particular towards the most deprived and vulnerable such as children and adolescents;
  • Share my time and material resources in a spirit of generosity to put an end to exclusion, injustice and political and economic oppression;
  • Defend freedom of expression and cultural diversity, giving preference always to dialogue and listening without engaging in fanaticism, defamation and the rejection of others;
  • Promote consumer behavior that is responsible and development practices that respect all forms of life and preserve the balance of nature on the planet;
  • Contribute to the development of my community, with the full participation of women and respect for democratic principles, in order to create together new forms of solidarity.
Last modified on Tuesday, 29 June 2010 23:00
Robert Stewart

Robert Stewart

Bob is a Chartered Accountant and Certified Management Consultant by profession.  He has held many senior management positions in business and government over the past 36 years. His passion for peace was ignited by his involvement in the Rotary International convention that took place in Calgary in 1996.  The message that he heard was "peace is the most worthwhile cause, and you should do something".  Since that time, Bob has founded the Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace and leads the Canadian Culture of Peace Program.  His peace website at www.peace.ca <http://www.peace.ca/>   has been ranked number 1 by Google with over 50,000 visitors per month, and he has been referred to as "the foremost peace educator in Canada". In 2000, Bob was the recipient of the YMCA Peace Award at the annual presentation in Calgary.

Bob recognized, as do others, that the Culture of Peace Program is on the threshold of making a major impact pacifically, nationally and internationally, but is currently lacking direction and capacity. He has devoted himself to using his professional skills as a (general) manager and information manager to help advance this 'direction and capacity' by founding the Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace, the Canadian Culture of Peace Program, annual national and provincial peace education conferences, and Peace Cafés.

He has 3 children, a key influence on Bob's decision to 'make a difference with his life' during the International Decade for Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World.

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